So, you’ve been through the application process, crossed the first few hurdles and have secured a job interview — congratulations! Now it’s time to prepare, and we’ve got you covered. Over the next few posts you’ll learn:

  • How to prepare your answering technique to the interview questions
  • Prepare your own questions for employers
  • Make a great first impression
  • What to bring to the interview
  • Tips on good manners and body language
  • How to win them over with your authenticity and positivity

Interviews are not something to be afraid or overly worried about, as we often remind our clients, interviews are a two way street and the interview process is as much about you interviewing the potential employer as it is them interviewing you. The main thing to remember is – just as in your CV – to be truthful and to be yourself during the interview and to take note of the posts over the next few weeks for tips and pointers to help you make the best, truthful impression and have a positive interview experience where the potential employer gets all the information they need about you and you get all the information you need from them. 

Tip 6 – Remember good manners and body language: 

Non-verbal communication can be just as important as anything you say in the interview.

Use confident, accessible body language. Smile frequently. Make eye contact when you’re speaking. Sit or stand tall with your shoulders back. Before the interview, take a deep breath and exhale slowly. This will help you manage any feelings of anxiety and will encourage greater self-confidence.

Treat every single person you encounter with respect. This includes people on the road and in the car park, security personnel and front desk staff. Treat everyone you don’t know as though they’re the hiring manager. Even if they aren’t, your potential employer might ask for their feedback.

Nail the handshake – during a job interview, the hiring manager (or person in seniority) should extend their hand first to initiate the handshake. Stand, look the person in the eye and smile. A good handshake should be firm but not crush the other person’s fingers.

Send personalised thank you notes to each interviewer. You may want to ask for the business card of each person you speak with during the interview process so that you can follow up individually with a separate thank you email—if they don’t have a business card, you could ask for their email address and make a note of it. If you interviewed in the morning, send your follow-up emails the same day. If you are interviewed in the afternoon, the next morning is fine. Make certain that each email is distinct from the others, using the notes you took during the conversations.

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